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Friday, June 23rd, 2017
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
The microbiome-gut-brain axis: implications for schizophrenia and antipsychotic induced weight gain.

PubMed

 

Resource

European archives of psychiatry and clinical neuroscience 2017 Jun 18; ()

Authors

Kanji S1; Fonseka TM2; Marshe VS3; Sriretnakumar V4; Hahn MK5; Müller DJ6;

Author Information
  • 1Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, R 132, Toronto, ON, Canada.
  • 2Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, R 132, Toronto, ON, Canada.
  • 3Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, R 132, Toronto, ON, Canada.
  • 4Psychiatric Neurogenetics Lab, Molecular Brain Science Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8, Canada.
  • 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
  • 6Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, R 132, Toronto, ON, Canada. daniel.mueller@camh.ca.

Abstract

With the emergence of knowledge implicating the human gut microbiome in the development and regulation of several physiological systems, evidence has accumulated to suggest a role for the gut microbiome in psychiatric conditions and drug response. A complex relationship between the enteric nervous system, the gut microbiota and the central nervous system has been described which allows for the microbiota to influence and respond to a variety of behaviors and psychiatric conditions. Additionally, the use of pharmaceuticals may interact with and alter the microbiota to potentially contribute to adverse effects of the drug. The gut microbiota has been described in several psychiatric disorders including depression and anxiety, but only a few reports have discussed the role of the microbiome in schizophrenia. The following review examines the evidence surrounding the gut microbiota in behavior and psychiatric illness, the role of the microbiota in schizophrenia and the potential for antipsychotics to alter the gut microbiota and promote adverse metabolic events.



PMID

28624847

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article, Review


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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