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Friday, June 23rd, 2017
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
Basal and Bolus Insulin Dose Changes after Switching Basal Insulin to Insulin Degludec in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Pilot Study.

PubMed

 

Resource

Clinical drug investigation 2017 Jun 18; ()

Authors

Hamamoto Y1; Honjo S2; Fujimoto K3; Tokumoto S4; Ikeda H5; Wada Y6; Koshiyama H7;

Author Information
  • 1Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, The Tazuke Kofukai Foundation, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, Japan. hamamoto@kitano-hp.or.jp.
  • 2Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, The Tazuke Kofukai Foundation, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
  • 3Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, The Tazuke Kofukai Foundation, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
  • 4Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, The Tazuke Kofukai Foundation, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
  • 5Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, The Tazuke Kofukai Foundation, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
  • 6Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, The Tazuke Kofukai Foundation, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
  • 7Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, The Tazuke Kofukai Foundation, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Ultra-long-acting insulin degludec (DEG) has a longer duration of action and less daily variability relative to other basal insulin (BI), and thus may benefit patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). We examined the impact of switching BI to DEG on glycemic control and insulin dose in T1DM.

METHODS: T1DM patients (n = 22; six male; mean age: 64.5 ± 12.6 years) receiving basal-bolus insulin therapy were included. Initially, the BI dose was replaced with DEG in a 1:1 ratio; 80-100% of the total dose was replaced with DEG for multiple basal insulin injections. DEG was titrated according to study protocol. Changes in HbA1c, daily insulin dose, glycemic self-monitored blood glucose variations, and hypoglycemia frequency were evaluated for 24 weeks.

RESULTS: Once-daily DEG significantly decreased HbA1c levels when switched from once-daily BI (7.9 ± 0.8 vs. 7.5 ± 0.9%, p = 0.020) and maintained HbA1c when switched from twice-daily BI (8.5 ± 1.6 vs. 8.4 ± 1.2%, p = 0.457). The BI dose decreased by -7.8 ± 13.9% (p = 0.017) and -16.6 ± 16.9% (p = 0.050) when switched from once-daily BI and twice-daily BI, respectively. The total bolus insulin dose significantly decreased when switched from once-daily BI (21.7 ± 8.3 to 19.3 ± 8.8 U/day, p = 0.016) especially in the injection before breakfast and evening meal. Body weight and hypoglycemia frequency was not significantly different.

CONCLUSION: DEG improved glycemic control when switched from once-daily BI and maintained glycemic control when switched from twice-daily BI without increasing hypoglycemia.



PMID

28624930

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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