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Thursday, September 14th, 2017
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
Sustained effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Healthy Activity Programme, a brief psychological treatment for depression delivered by lay counsellors in primary care: 12-month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial.

PubMed

 

Resource

PLoS medicine 2017 Sep 12; 14(9)

Authors

Weobong B1; Weiss HA2; McDaid D3; Singla DR4; Hollon SD5; Nadkarni A6; Park AL7; Bhat B8; Katti B9; Anand A10; Dimidjian S11; Araya R12; King M13; Vijayakumar L14; Wilson GT15; Velleman R16; Kirkwood BR17; Fairburn CG18; Patel V19;

Author Information
  • 1Centre for Global Mental Health, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
  • 2MRC Tropical Epidemiology Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
  • 3Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom.
  • 4Department of Psychiatry, Sinai Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • 5Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
  • 6Centre for Global Mental Health, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
  • 7Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom.
  • 8Sangath, Socorro, Goa, India.
  • 9Sangath, Socorro, Goa, India.
  • 10Sangath, Socorro, Goa, India.
  • 11Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America.
  • 12Centre for Global Mental Health, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
  • 13Division of Psychiatry, Faculty of Brain Sciences, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • 14SNEHA, Voluntary Health Services, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
  • 15Department of Psychology, School of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States of America.
  • 16Sangath, Socorro, Goa, India.
  • 17Centre for Global Mental Health, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
  • 18Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
  • 19Centre for Global Mental Health, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Healthy Activity Programme (HAP), a brief behavioural intervention delivered by lay counsellors, enhanced remission over 3 months among primary care attendees with depression in peri-urban and rural settings in India. We evaluated the sustainability of the effects after treatment termination, the cost-effectiveness of HAP over 12 months, and the effects of the hypothesized mediator of activation on clinical outcomes.

METHODS AND FINDINGS: Primary care attendees aged 18-65 years screened with moderately severe to severe depression on the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) were randomised to either HAP plus enhanced usual care (EUC) (n = 247) or EUC alone (n = 248), of whom 95% completed assessments at 3 months, and 91% at 12 months. Primary outcomes were severity on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and remission on the PHQ-9. HAP participants maintained the gains they showed at the end of treatment through the 12-month follow-up (difference in mean BDI-II score between 3 and 12 months = -0.34; 95% CI -2.37, 1.69; p = 0.74), with lower symptom severity scores than participants who received EUC alone (adjusted mean difference in BDI-II score = -4.45; 95% CI -7.26, -1.63; p = 0.002) and higher rates of remission (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] = 1.36; 95% CI 1.15, 1.61; p < 0.009). They also fared better on most secondary outcomes, including recovery (aPR = 1.98; 95% CI 1.29, 3.03; p = 0.002), any response over time (aPR = 1.45; 95% CI 1.27, 1.66; p < 0.001), higher likelihood of reporting a minimal clinically important difference (aPR = 1.42; 95% CI 1.17, 1.71; p < 0.001), and lower likelihood of reporting suicidal behaviour (aPR = 0.71; 95% CI 0.51, 1.01; p = 0.06). HAP plus EUC also had a marginal effect on WHO Disability Assessment Schedule score at 12 months (aPR = -1.58; 95% CI -3.33, 0.17; p = 0.08); other outcomes (days unable to work, intimate partner violence toward females) did not statistically significantly differ between the two arms. Economic analyses indicated that HAP plus EUC was dominant over EUC alone, with lower costs and better outcomes; uncertainty analysis showed that from this health system perspective there was a 95% chance of HAP being cost-effective, given a willingness to pay threshold of Intl$16,060-equivalent to GDP per capita in Goa-per quality-adjusted life year gained. Patient-reported behavioural activation level at 3 months mediated the effect of the HAP intervention on the 12-month depression score (β = -2.62; 95% CI -3.28, -1.97; p < 0.001). Serious adverse events were infrequent, and prevalence was similar by arm. We were unable to assess possible episodes of remission and relapse that may have occurred between our outcome assessment time points of 3 and 12 months after randomisation. We did not account for or evaluate the effect of mediators other than behavioural activation.

CONCLUSIONS: HAP's superiority over EUC at the end of treatment was largely stable over time and was mediated by patient activation. HAP provides better outcomes at lower costs from a perspective covering publicly funded healthcare services and productivity impacts on patients and their families.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN registry ISRCTN95149997.



PMID

28898283

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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