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Thursday, September 14th, 2017
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
Cue exposure therapy reduces overeating of exposed and non-exposed foods in obese adolescents.

PubMed

 

Resource

Journal of behavior therapy and experimental psychiatry 2017 Sep 12; 58()

Authors

Schyns G1; Roefs A2; Smulders FTY3; Jansen A4;

Author Information
  • 1Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: ghislaine.schyns@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
  • 2Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
  • 3Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
  • 4Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study tested whether two sessions of food cue exposure therapy reduced eating in the absence of hunger (EAH), specified for exposed and non-exposed food, in overweight and obese adolescents, and whether habituation of food cue reactivity and reduced CS-US expectancies predicted a decrease in EAH.

METHODS: 41 overweight adolescents (aged 12-18 years) were randomly assigned to a cue exposure intervention or a lifestyle intervention (control condition). Habituation of food cue reactivity (self-reported desire to eat and salivation) and CS-US expectancy were measured during both sessions, and EAH was measured at the end of session two.

RESULTS: Compared to the control condition, the cue exposure condition showed less EAH for the exposed food item as well as for the non-exposed food items. Larger within-session (WSH) and between-session habituation (BSH) of cue reactivity were not related to less EAH, change in CS-US expectancy was unrelated to EAH.

LIMITATIONS: The study was underpowered, and compliance to homework instructions between sessions was poor, intervention effects might have been larger when participants adhered to daily homework exercises.

CONCLUSIONS: Food cue exposure was effective to reduce EAH of exposed and non-exposed food items, indicating generalisability of the exposure effect. In line with exposure effects in anxiety disorders, habituation was not found to benefit outcome, though the present data do also not provide evidence that CS-US expectancy violation predicts EAH.

Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID

28898708

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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