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Friday, September 22nd, 2017
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
Effect of follow-up by a hospital diabetes care team on diabetes control at one year after discharge from the hospital.

PubMed

 

Resource

Diabetes research and clinical practice 2017 Aug 12; 133()

Authors

Garg R1; Hurwitz S2; Rein R3; Schuman B4; Underwood P5; Bhandari S6;

Author Information
  • 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States. Electronic address: rgarg@bwh.harvard.edu.
  • 2Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
  • 3Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
  • 4Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
  • 5Veterans Health Administration, 150 South Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02130, United States.
  • 6Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States.

Abstract

AIM: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of continued follow-up by a hospital diabetes team on HbA1c at 1-year after discharge.

METHODS: Adults with HbA1c ≥8% (64mmol/mol), undergoing an elective surgery, were treated in the perioperative period and randomized to continued care (CC) or the usual care (UC) after discharge. Patients in the CC group received weekly to monthly phone calls from a diabetes specialist nurse practitioner (NP) to review their home blood glucose values, diet, exercise, and medications. Patients in the UC group followed with their diabetes care providers.

RESULTS: Out of 151 patients, 77 were randomized to the CC group and 74 to the UC group. HbA1c (%) at 1-year was 8.2±1.4 in the CC group and 8.5±1.5 in the UC group (p=NS). Change in HbA1c from baseline was similar between the groups; -0.7±1.4 in the CC versus -0.7±1.5 in the UC group (p=NS). A higher number of calls was not associated with lower HbA1c or reduction in HbA1c. There were 41 insulin-treated patients in the CC group and 53 in the UC group and among them, HbA1c reduction was 0.5±1.5 and 0.6±1.3 respectively (p=NS).

CONCLUSIONS: Optimal perioperative treatment of diabetes is associated with an improvement in HbA1c but continued follow-up by a hospital diabetes team after discharge does not have an additional impact on long-term glycemic control. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02065050.

Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID

28898714

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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