www.diseases-diagnosis.com Homepage Diseases Symptoms Diseases Diagnosis Diseases Treatment Diseases Living Care Diseases Prevention Diseases Research
www
Search
March 26, 2016
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
progesterone receptor

Wikipedia

 

The progesterone receptor ( PR ) also known as NR3C3 ( nuclear receptor subfamily 3, group C, member 3), is an intracellular steroid receptor that specifically binds progesterone. In humans, PR is encoded by a single PGR gene residing on chromosome 11q22,




Steroid or nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) constitute an important superfamily of transcription regulators that are involved in widely diverse physiological functions, including control of embryonic development, cell differentiation and homeostasis. Members of the superfamily include the steroid hormone receptors and receptors for thyroid hormone, retinoids, 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 and a variety of other ligands. The proteins function as dimeric molecules in nuclei to regulate the transcription of target genes in a ligand-responsive manner. In addition to C-terminal ligand-binding domains, these nuclear receptors contain a highly-conserved, N-terminal zinc-finger that mediates specific binding to target DNA sequences, termed ligand-responsive elements. In the absence of ligand, steroid hormone receptors are thought to be weakly associated with nuclear components; hormone binding greatly increases receptor affinity.

NRs are extremely important in medical research, a large number of them being implicated in diseases such as cancer, diabetes, hormone resistance syndromes, etc. While several NRs act as ligand-inducible transcription factors, many do not yet have a defined ligand and are accordingly termed "orphan" receptors. During the last decade, more than 300 NRs have been described, many of which are orphans, which cannot easily be named due to current nomenclature has recently been introduced in an attempt to rationalise the increasingly complex set of names used to describe superfamily members.




In common with other steroid receptors, the progesterone receptor has a N-terminal regulatory domain, a DNA binding domain, a hinge section, and a C-terminal ligand binding domain. A special transcription activation function (TAF), called TAF-3, is present in the progesterone receptor-B, in a B-upstream segment (BUS) at the amino acid terminal. This segment is not present in the receptor-A.




As demonstrated in progesterone receptor-deficient mice, the physiological effects of progesterone depend completely on the presence of the human progesterone receptor (hPR), a member of the steroid-receptor superfamily of nuclear receptors. The single-copy human (hPR) gene uses separate promoters and translational start sites to produce two isoforms, hPR-A and -B, which are identical except for an additional 165 amino acids present only in the N terminus of hPR-B. Although hPR-B shares many important structural domains as hPR-A, they are in fact two functionally distinct transcription factors, mediating their own response genes and physiological effects with little overlap. Selective ablation of PR-A in a mouse model, resulting in exclusive production of PR-B, unexpectedly revealed that PR-B contributes to, rather than inhibits, epithelial cell proliferation both in response to estrogen alone and in the presence of progesterone and estrogen. These results suggest that in the uterus, the PR-A isoform is necessary to oppose estrogen-induced proliferation as well as PR-B-dependent proliferation.




Six variable sites, including four polymorphisms and five common haplotypes have been identified in the human PR gene .

Several studies have now shown no association between progesterone receptor gene +331G/A polymorphisms and breast or endometrial cancers. However, these follow-up studies lacked the sample size and statistical power to make any definitive conclusions, due to the rarity of the +331A SNP. It is currently unknown which if any polymorphisms in this receptor is of significance to cancer.




Estrogen is necessary to induce the progesterone receptors. When no binding hormone is present the carboxyl terminal inhibits transcription . Binding to a hormone induces a structural change that removes the inhibitory action. Progesterone antagonists prevent the structural reconfiguration.

After progesterone binds to the receptor, restructuring with dimer ization follows and the complex enters the nucleus and binds to DNA. There transcription takes place, resulting in formation of messenger RNA that is translated by ribosomes to produce specific proteins.




Progesterone receptor antagonists work as antiprogestins. The main example is mifepristone. Selective progesterone receptor modulators may also have more or less antagonist activity.




Progesterone receptor has been shown to interact with:

  • KLF9,

  • Nuclear receptor co-repressor 2, and

  • UBE3A.




  • Selective progesterone receptor modulator








This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "progesterone receptor".


Last Modified:   2010-11-25


Search
All informatin on the site is © www.diseases-diagnosis.com 2002-2011. Last revised: January 2, 2011
Are you interested in our site or/and want to use our information? please read how to contact us and our copyrights.
To let us provide you with high quality information, you can help us by making a more or less donation: